5 Ways to Keep Your Workout Habits Interesting

Workout Habits

In writing about keeping an all-natural diet, Sam Thayer cautions that force-feeding yourself bitter greens and distasteful organic soup is the wrong way. “There’s nothing enjoy more than venison steak and salsify sprouts,” writes Thayer in Nature’s Garden. “Find what you like within what you need.”

The same goes for your workout routine. If you find yourself drowning in the monotony of the same exercise regimen, a few tweaks can help you stay motivated. Apply your creativity and start craving the workout again!

Outdoor Running

A treadmill can be a lonely, boring place to run your “laps.” So try running in your local park. Scenery and wildlife can be a terrific diversion and mood lift while allowing diversity in your running – sprinting up a lush hillside can be much more rewarding than simply pressing the “climb” button on your mechanical in-home surface. Live in the inner city and not sure where to go? Try looking up your local web resources to find spacious and scenic parks wherever you live.

Workout Room Entertainment

Sometimes, the most beneficial exercises can seem the most repetitive and lackluster – such as calisthenics or endless pull-ups. A well-designed entertainment center in your workout room can be the best antidote.

Many experts believe that the “rhythm” of TV shows – Act 1, commercial, Act 2, commercial, climax, and so on can actually help plan and execute a workout regimen. But careful with your posture! Research shows that becoming too engrossed in a TV program or a movie can hurt posture during a treadmill session, putting undue stress on your already-exerted body.

Competitive Sports

Despite the cliché of the driven, passionate weight-lifter toning in solitude, many find that a solitary workout routine can be lonely and draining over the long haul. Meanwhile, group exercise is often associated with golf leagues, leisure cycling and so on. But if intense muscle-building and cardiovascular fitness is your bag, try a contact sport. Men’s recreational leagues in ice hockey, rugby and even American football are rife in all fifty … Read the rest....

Sermorelin Research and Heart Damage

Sermorelin

A new study in swine (pigs) has found that sermorelin can reduce scarring of heart muscle after a heart attack. This information confirms previous findings from research in rat models of heart attack. In the future, sermorelin and other GHRH agonists may be useful for treating post-infarction (after a heart attack) patients. These peptides have the potential to reduce long-term damage, speed recovery, and reduce complication rates.

The Scale of the Problem

Survival following a heart attack has improved with advances in care, but damage to the heart muscle often leads to a weakened pump function and heart failure. This is a serious condition, as 50% of individuals die within 5 years of a diagnosis of heart failure1. Clearly, reducing long-term consequences of a heart attack can improve survival. It can also improve morbidity as heart failure is an extremely debilitating condition.

The immediate damage caused by a heart attack is only one part of a larger problem that eventually leads to fatal heart failure. Other components of the problem include scar formation as well as generalized inflammation. Scar formation occurs secondary to wound healing. It can weaken the walls of the heart and interfere with the normal conduction of electrical signals. Post-infarction inflammation can weaken both the mechanical structure and electrical functioning of the heart as well. Without proper muscle structure, the heart cannot contract with enough force. Without proper electrical functioning, contractions are not coordinated or efficient and flow becomes turbulent. The ability to reduce inflammation and cardiac remodeling could drastically reduce the long-term consequences of heart attack2.

The Role of GHRH Agonists in Myocardial Repair

The current management of heart failure aims to maximize the effectiveness of whatever heart function remains. Unfortunately, morbidity and mortality remain high because the heart, in its weakened state, is more vulnerable to the effects of aging. New therapies aim to prevent remodeling, the change in heart structure that occurs secondary to scar formation and inflammation and which ultimately makes the heart weaker and less able to withstand the effects of aging.… Read the rest....